Why you need to use two-factor authentication

Why you need to use two-factor authentication

<p>How much protection do you think passwords provide today to your company's Web sites, mobile devices and desktop computers? The right answer? Probably not much. Cyber criminals have mastered the art of cracking passwords. And too often, employees make use of passwords that are easy to guess. This leaves your business susceptible to cyber attacks. Thankfully, there's a solution: two-factor authentication. And, based on a recent story by Biztech Magazine, it's the easiest way to immediately boost your company's ability to safeguard itself from cyber crimes.</p> <p><strong>Two steps are better than one</strong></p> <p>The most effective way to prevent cyber crimes is to make hacking much more of a challenge. This is exactly why, according to Biztech Magazine, two-factor authentication works so well. First, a worker must enter a password. But to get into their machines or Web sites, people must also follow up with a second action. They might need to use a biometric identifier to get into a particularly sensitive Web site. Or, they might need to swipe a smart code or insert a token to log onto a computer. By having a second step, your organization will deter the vast majority of hackers.</p> <p><strong>The starting point</strong></p> <p>Once you decide to implement two-factor authentication, you'll want to take steps to make sure that the transition is a simple one for your staff. And, as Biztech Magazine says, this begins with selecting the most appropriate second factor. For example, tokens might work well if most of your employees work in a central location. But if your business relies on workers who are spread across the country, tokens are probably not the best choice. Same for smart cards: These cards generally don't work with smartphones. If your employees rely on their smartphones to do business, smart cards might be the wrong choice for a second factor.</p> <p><strong>Take your time</strong></p> <p>Another key to proficiently launching two-factor authentication? You'll want to take your time. Provide staff members with a window of time to read about the system and ask questions. This will increase the odds that your staff members will be on board with the change. If you launch the system without providing the proper education, you&rsquo;ll simply alienate and aggravate your workers.</p>